Quotations by William Kingdon Clifford

24 Found
Displaying 1 through 24


Born: Sunday, May 4, 1845
Died: Monday, March 3, 1879 (33 years old)
Profession: Mathematician
Nationality: English


A little reflection will show us that every belief, even the simplest and most fundamental, goes beyond experience when regarded as a guide to our actions.
- William Kingdon Clifford
(Keywords: Experience, Belief, Actions, Reflection, Will)

An atmosphere of beliefs and conceptions has been formed by the labours and struggles of our forefathers, which enables us to breathe amid the various and complex circumstances of our life.
- William Kingdon Clifford
(Keywords: Life, Beliefs, Circumstances)

Every rustic who delivers in the village alehouse his slow, infrequent sentences, may help to kill or keep alive the fatal superstitions which clog his race.
- William Kingdon Clifford
(Keywords: Help, May, Race)

He who truly believes that which prompts him to an action has looked upon the action to lust after it, he has committed it already in his heart.
- William Kingdon Clifford
(Keywords: Heart, Action, Lust)

If a belief is not realized immediately in open deeds, it is stored up for the guidance of the future.
- William Kingdon Clifford
(Keywords: Belief, Deeds, Future, Guidance, Open)

If I steal money from any person, there may be no harm done from the mere transfer of possession; he may not feel the loss, or it may prevent him from using the money badly. But I cannot help doing this great wrong towards Man, that I make myself dishonest.
- William Kingdon Clifford
(Keywords: Money, Harm, Help, Loss, Man, May, Possession, Wrong)

In like manner, if I let myself believe anything on insufficient evidence, there may be no great harm done by the mere belief; it may be true after all, or I may never have occasion to exhibit it in outward acts.
- William Kingdon Clifford
(Keywords: Belief, Harm, May)

Into this, for good or ill, is woven every belief of every man who has speech of his fellows. A awful privilege, and an awful responsibility, that we should help to create the world in which posterity will live.
- William Kingdon Clifford
(Keywords: Belief, Help, Man, Posterity, Privilege, Responsibility, Speech, Will, World)

It is wrong always, everywhere, and for anyone, to believe anything upon insufficient evidence.
- William Kingdon Clifford
(Keywords: Wrong)

Namely, we have no right to believe a thing true because everybody says so unless there are good grounds for believing that some one person at least has the means of knowing what is true, and is speaking the truth so far as he knows it.
- William Kingdon Clifford
(Keywords: Truth, Right)

No simplicity of mind, no obscurity of station, can escape the universal duty of questioning all that we believe.
- William Kingdon Clifford
(Keywords: Duty, Mind, Obscurity, Questioning, Simplicity)

Nor is it that truly a belief at all which has not some influence upon the actions of him who holds it.
- William Kingdon Clifford
(Keywords: Belief, Actions, Influence)

Our lives our guided by that general conception of the course of things which has been created by society for social purposes.
- William Kingdon Clifford
(Keywords: Society)

The danger to society is not merely that it should believe wrong things, though that is great enough; but that it should become credulous, and lose the habit of testing things and inquiring into them; for then it must sink back into savagery.
- William Kingdon Clifford
(Keywords: Society, Habit, Danger, Testing, Wrong)

The harm which is done by credulity in a man is not confined to the fostering of a credulous character in others, and consequent support of false beliefs.
- William Kingdon Clifford
(Keywords: Character, Beliefs, Credulity, Harm, Man, Support)

The rule which should guide us in such cases is simple and obvious enough: that the aggregate testimony of our neighbours is subject to the same conditions as the testimony of any one of them.
- William Kingdon Clifford
(Keywords: Obvious)

There is no scientific discoverer, no poet, no painter, no musician, who will not tell you that he found ready made his discovery or poem or picture - that it came to him from outside, and that he did not consciously create it from within.
- William Kingdon Clifford
(Keywords: Discovery, Will)

This sense of power is the highest and best of pleasures when the belief on which it is founded is a true belief, and has been fairly earned by investigation.
- William Kingdon Clifford
(Keywords: Power, Belief, Investigation, Sense)

To consider only one other such witness: the followers of the Buddha have at least as much right to appeal to individual and social experience in support of the authority of the Eastern saviour.
- William Kingdon Clifford
(Keywords: Experience, Authority, Followers, Right, Support)

To know all about anything is to know how to deal with it under all circumstances.
- William Kingdon Clifford
(Keywords: Circumstances)

To sum up: it is wrong always, everywhere, and for anyone, to believe anything upon insufficient evidence.
- William Kingdon Clifford
(Keywords: Wrong)

We feel much happier and more secure when we think we know precisely what to do, no matter what happens, then when we have lost our way and do not know where to turn.
- William Kingdon Clifford

We may always depend on it that algebra, which cannot be translated into good English and sound common sense, is bad algebra.
- William Kingdon Clifford
(Keywords: Common sense, English, May, Sound)

When an action is once done, it is right or wrong for ever; no accidental failure of its good or evil fruits can possibly alter that.
- William Kingdon Clifford
(Keywords: Action, Failure, Evil, Right, Wrong)







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